Thursday, April 30, 2015

Who I Am (Part 1: Fundamentals)

Last year about this time, I posited the question to myself, "Who wants to know me?"  It was the name of a blog post that I never finished, but one that the events of the last few months have compelled me to complete, with a more succinct title.  There really is no telling what this will accomplish, but when it comes down to it, the only way to connect with readers, or other people in general, is to put yourself out there to be known.  I don't know if this will gain me any new fans, but at this point there's nowhere to go but up.  So, at the risk of alienating one of my 5 remaining readers, here goes...

The Introvert:  The first thing anyone should realize when getting to know me is that I am quite the introvert.  I am quiet and shy, observant and private.  I tend to keep to myself because strangers simply make me uncomfortable.  I could never be "the life of the party" or the boisterous entertainer up on stage, or that outgoing charmer introducing himself to random people.  This is likely my greatest handicap when it comes to interpersonal relationships.  It takes time for me to get comfortable with people, and I also don't always get comfortable with people, depending on who they are and how they behave.  I'm never the one to make the first step, either, and tend to avoid conversation with unfamiliar people, because it's awkward for me.

The Moralist:  The other thing that tends to hinder my social interactions is something I rarely speak about, because it is very personal and also tends to alienate just about everyone.  I have an inborn sense of morality, something that you can't learn in Sunday School or from mortal education.  I can't explain why, other than to say I was simply born with a hyperactive sense of right and wrong, which tends to invade the "gray" area that most people tend to tread.  I believe in keeping my mind clear, untouched by drugs or alcohol, I keep my body free from piercings and tattoos, and I find sexual promiscuity is disturbing (this is one reason my pending divorce is so distressing.  I still find it hard to imagine being sexual with anyone besides my wife, even though she has left me and is shacked up with another man.  Okay, perhaps a bit too much information, but this is all about who I am, after all.  And part of that is the fact that I always believed I would never have more than one sexual partner, ever.  Now I just feel sickened inside.  Perhaps I'll simply remain chaste the rest of my days).  As I was saying, the morality I follow is not derived from a religion of man, but from my own internal feelings.  Most people do things that creep me out, so I don't get that close to them.  I don't mean to say that they're wrong to do it, but I can't help what I feel, and I feel downright uncomfortable by a lot of things that people tend to call "normal."  Yes, I'm the weird one.

The Inherent Libertarian Conflict:  Checking the other side of the moral equation, I also tend to hold to many libertarian beliefs.  Despite my own morality, and inherent feeling that a lot of the stuff people do makes me sick to my soul, I still hold to the belief that people have the right to choose for themselves.  If they wish to enjoy themselves in ways that I don't enjoy or I find unpleasant to behold, then that is their prerogative, so long as they keep it to themselves and don't try to foist it upon me or anyone else who isn't interested in their lifestyle choices.  Yet this then falls to the question of how much are others affected, and what is permissible when it comes to self-harm.  It is all well and good to say a man can have his drink or toke, but we must also look to those he affects by taking that drink or smoke.  Most obviously, we need drunk driving laws to protect everyone, just as one example, but there's more than that.  There is a cause and effect to everything, and for each "responsible" drug addict or drunk, there are countless people affected by their actions in adverse ways.  It is a sociological quandary to question the impact of libertarianism upon society, while the opposite is also troubling.  You can't deny people freedom, but how do you justify the inadvertent harm they do to others?  The psychological poisoning of youth, the depreciation of productivity, the decay of civil society itself?  Damned if you do, damned if you don't.  That is where I am always at war with myself.  The greater good, and who can you save?  This also contributes to my anonymity; I often avoid getting involved with people, so I do not risk incurring their wrath when my overactive morality tries to butt into their lives.  Which leads me to...

The Hero Complex:  I've spent much of my life as an idealist.  I have fought for what I deemed to be right, and sought to better the world around me.  I try to help those who earnestly seek my assistance when I am actually capable of providing aid, though it's rare that anyone does due to my private nature.  Most people don't get close enough to know me well enough to ask, and fewer still fall in the purview of my moral imperatives to benefit from my wisdom.  So, basically, I wish I could save the world, but nobody wants me to, so I am coming to that point in life where I don't want to bother trying anymore.  I've been bitten so many times trying to do the right thing that I grow weary of sticking my neck out.  I'm sorry for those I have failed, and damn those who would damn me!

The Observer:  The plus side to my natural introversion is the ability to observe.  I pay attention to those around me.  I'm a great listener, and I have a knack for reading people.  I would have made a good psychiatrist, as I'm able to understand people's feeling, behaviors, and motivations, which comes in handy for my writing.  Though, it can also add to my introversion, as I can tell why people behave the way they do, and it can be disturbing as well.

The Alien:  When it comes down to it, all of my inherent feelings, my spiritualism, my instincts; they leave me feeling very alien among the sea of humanity.  Each day feels more and more like an anthropological expedition, where I am the outsider living among beings who are physiologically similar to me, but hardly the same.  I understand mankind, yet I so often feel separate, for I just don't think or feel the way human animals tend to.  I'm just plain different, and in the end that's the biggest thing that keeps people from knowing who I am, for how can they relate to me?

Okay, now that I've exposed a part of my soul to the world, I can sit back and relax, knowing that most people won't care, and even fewer will truly comprehend.  I commend those few of you out there who bother to give me more than a passing glance, and I thank those of you who will remain to consider me a friend, despite my intolerant weirdness.  This is merely scratching the surface, but it's the foundation of knowing me that so few people have ever even tried to see.



Sunday, March 1, 2015

Yarr! A Space Pirate Anthology: Release Date & TOC Revealed.

I would like to thank all my readers and writers during this turbulent time in my life.  As life must go on, so must Martinus Publishing, and I am pleased to announce that the manuscript has been compiled for Yarr! A Space Pirate Anthology, and editing has now commenced.  I can now place the set-in-stone release date for this anthology to be June 1, 2015!  When we get closer to that release date, pre-orders will commence, so keep your eyes open for that.

The Table of Contents has now been finalized, and here for the first time is your glimpse at the compilation's stories:

1:  La Belle Dame Sans Merci –by Nye Joell Hardy
2:  Drawing A Line –by Dan Gainor
3:  Impunity –by Sophie Duncum & William Rade
4:  Space Pigs –by Katie Tillwick
5:  X Marks the Planet –by DJ Tyrer
6:  Back from the Dead Red –by Lizz-Ayn Shaarawi
7:  Demise of the Star Queen –by Frank Sawielijew
8:  Milt's Last Raid –by Jordan Legg
9:  When The Devil Drives –by Vincent Morgan
10:  Vendetta's End –by Martin T. Ingham
11:  Dusties –by Jeff Provine
12:  The Daring Spacers –by Sergio Palumbo
13:  Far, Far from Now –by Curtis James McConnell
14:  The Lighthouse Keeper's Daughter –by Mary Pletsch
15:  Dear Madeline –by Joseph Conat
16:  The Harrowing Account of the Untimely Death of Bandit McGee, Space Thief Extraordinaire –by Fable Vayne
17:  For the Times They Are A-Changin' –By Bruno Lombardi

This would have been an 18 story anthology, but sadly 1 author got cold feet (repeatedly) and begged to be let loose from his signed agreement.  I will not give him the dignity of repeating his name in public, for risk that it might give him any publicity.  Needless to say, the offending writer doesn't deserve to be featured in a Martinus Publishing anthology, and never will.

On another note, there are still a few stories I need to approve for The Temporal Element II, We Were Heroes, and Altered Europa.  If you have a story submitted and haven't heard from me yet, do not fear.  I'll get to it by the end of the month.  This is a turbulent time for me, so please bear with me.


Want to cheer me up?  Buy a Martinus Publishing book today!

Saturday, February 14, 2015

Goodbye to Love

Everyone who knows me or has been following me on this blog lately knows that I've had some troubling emotional issues going on at home. Though I didn't explain much about it because it was very personal, I'm afraid we're reaching the point where the difficulties have grown beyond total privacy, and now everyone is discovering my pain.

My wife and I have been going through problems for quite a while, more my wife than myself.  She grew distant and depressed over the past year, and it caused us occasional strife.  Sadly, neither of us knew how to deal with what she was going through, and I didn't realize how bad things were until she finally broke down and left me.  It was horrific and shocking, and I still can't believe some of the things she said.

It's been a week now, and life is never going to be the same.  We've been talking since the break-up, and we're getting back to being on fairly good terms, though it is clear that divorce is unavoidable.  We may be better as friends than we were as a couple, oddly enough.  I just want her to be happy, and if this is what makes her happy, then so be it.

The saddest thing out of all of this is that I know she still loves me, but it's complicated.  I cannot give her what she wants or needs, and she cannot take care of our 4 children.  Caring for them was the principal factor in her mental breakdown, and I was too busy to even notice.  While she was losing her mind, unable to cope with the responsibilities of being a mother, I was busy working.  I buried myself in my writing and editing when I wasn't on other jobs.  Rather than face the fact that she was unhappy and unsuited to being a wife and mother.  I ignored her recently, and it cost me dearly.  I wish she could have left more amicably, without feeling the need to gain sympathy from friends with gross slander, which she now apologizes for profusely.  I wish she could have talked to me sooner.

Now I am saddled with the unenviable task of being both parents to four children, while dealing with the emotional torment of being abandoned by the woman I love.  It could be a lot worse, and if certain people had their way it would be.  There are actually people in our lives that think we should be at each other's throats, or somehow can never be on good terms.  They cannot understand that we want to be reconciled as friends, even if we aren't going to be married anymore.  Those people never understood us, and never will.  I wish they would keep their noses out of our business, and their opinions to themselves.

I look back on everything, and I wonder if I'll ever write again.  Right now, I can't, and I'm starting to feel that my writing may have cost me my marriage.  When my wife was losing her mind, I was sitting in front of my computer, writing and editing, pursuing this dream that has consumed my entire life.  I wonder, what has it ever given me but heartache?  I never got a damn thing out of it, and now it's taken away the only woman I ever loved.  What's the point?

I don't really know at this point if I'll ever write again.  I'll keep with editing other people's work right now, because I am committed to that and I cannot go back on my commitments, unlike some people.  Though a few Martinus anthologies may be slightly delayed, I promise you that all 5 forthcoming anthologies will be published!  Yarr: A Space Pirate Anthology will be coming out this spring, followed by The Temporal Element, We Were Heroes, The Secret Life of Ghosts, and Altered Europa.  Have no doubt that those will be released, though perhaps a month or two later than originally scheduled.


I'm still holding on, though it is a painful ride...


Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Special Offers from Martinus Publishing:

So, it's almost the end of January.  In some respects it seems to have taken forever, but in others it seems like no time at all.  Regardless, here we are, and Martinus Publishing is moving forward.  A few weeks back, I sent this special off out to the Martinus Newsletter subscribers, and also shared it on our facebook page.  I realize that I neglected to share it in the most obvious place, on my personal blog.  Better late than never:

Happy New Year to our loyal readers & writers,

On behalf of myself and Martinus Publishing, I would like to wish each and every one of you a very happy and special New Year! 2014 has been one of exciting change for me and the small press, and as we enter into 2015, I anticipate new challenges and adventures!

A quick update on anthologies (revised 1/28/2015): I've now finished reviewing all of the stories submitted for The Secret Life of Ghosts, and there are currently 4 still fighting it out for 2 remaining slots.  I'll make a final call on these by Friday.  This was by far the most submitted to anthology in Martinus Publishing history. Other than that, there are still some selections to be made for The Temporal Element II, as well as Altered Europa, both of which officially closed to submissions on December 31. Other than that, there are still a few stories pending final approval for Yarr! & We Were Heroes.  I hope to have these final stories reviewed and decided upon in the next two weeks.

As a special thank you to all of you who have supported Martinus Publishing over the past 2 years, I would like to offer you this special bonus. Purchase any 1 print title from the Martinus Publishing website from now until January 31st 2015, and I will gift you a free .pdf copy of any one Martinus Publishing title currently in-print, in addition to a free .pdf copy of the book you purchased in-print. Just put Coupon Code: NEW2015 in the comments section of the paypal checkout, and specify which bonus .pdf title you would like to receive.

If all-print books is your thing, here is another bonus offer. Order any 3 Martinus Publishing titles from the website by January 31st and receive a Free print copy of any one Martinus Publishing title currently in print, or one that is to be released in the new year (this includes Altered Europa, The Temporal Element II, Yarr: A Space Pirate Anthology, The Secret Life of Ghosts, and We Were Heroes). Approximate publication dates for the unpublished anthologies are available upon request, but keep in mind those are tentative and are subject to change. However, all of these titles will be published in 2015, so if you want to reserve a free copy via this special offer, this is the time! Coupon Code 3NEW2015, and specify which book you'd like to receive for free.

Again, I wish you all a great and prosperous New Year! Read, write, and dare to dream!

-Martin T. Ingham
Senior Editor, Martinus Publishing
http://www.martinus.us/

As it's coming late, I will extend this special offer until Valentine's Day!  Yes, take advantage of any of these offers until February 14, 2015.  Order your books from Martinus today!

Monday, January 19, 2015

Martinus on the Move!

Happy 2015 everyone!

As we delve deeper into the back half of January, I'm pleased to say things are starting to shape up for Martinus Publishing.  The second half of 2014 showed a drop in some areas, but there are still some real positives, and I'm looking forward to seeing what the next year has in store.  Now, for a quick progress report.

The royalty reports for the back half of 2014 have been completed and will be going out to contributors in the next week, along with paypal payments.  With the exception of those few writers who opted out of our royalty program, every contributor will receive a share of the proceeds of book sales.  The more that sell, the bigger the cut, obviously, but this way everyone gets something.  This is the fairest payment format, and it is also the most logical for a small publisher like Martinus, as it prevents us from having to give out lump sums up front that we might never get back. It also keeps us from short-changing writers if a book sells big.  That is why the royalty system will remain for the foreseeable future.

The final stories have now been read for "The Secret Life of Ghosts," and the last round of acceptances and rejections will be send out next week.  This was a real tough one to read for, because there were so many stories and so many good stories.  I keep having to pass on some that I would really like to publish, just because there's only so much room available.

Formatting has begun for Yarr!  A Space Pirate anthology, though there are still a few stories to be decided upon.  This collection should be the next published release from Martinus, hopefully toward the end of February.  The last stories are also being reviewed for The Temporal Element II, and for Altered Europa.  These titles should be coming out in spring or early summer.  Meanwhile, We Were Heroes is receiving its final stories and will be closing to submissions at the end of February.  If you still haven't submitted, get your story sent in pronto!

I think that about covers the current happenings at the press.  Once these anthologies are taken care of and ready for market, it will be time to consider a new open anthology, but never again will I overload myself as I did last year.

So, to all my fellow writers out there, keep writing and keep reading.  Don't forget to pick up a Martinus Publishing anthology today!  Every copy sold goes to help your fellow scribes.



Friday, December 5, 2014

Author Interview: Bruno Lombardi 2

"To Hell with Dante" is a collection of cynical afterlife stories, ranging from comedic genius to dark surrealism.  To help kick off this fine anthology, I'll be conducting interviews with many of the contributors.  Today I'm interviewing Bruno Lombardi, the excellent author who contributed the stories "A Company of Deaths" and "Rendezvous."  Thank you for being here, Bruno.

BRUNO LOMBARDI: Thanks for having me!

MTI:  We've done this before, but for readers who didn't catch our previous interview, why not tell them a little about yourself?

BL:  I’m a civil servant by day for the Canadian government and a writer by night. I recently got engaged to the most awesome woman in the world and we’re hoping to ‘pull the trigger’, so to speak, in late 2015 or early 2016.

MTI:  You have the unique distinction of having two separate stories in To Hell with Dante.  First off, tell us a little bit about "A Company of Deaths." What's the general idea behind it?

BL:  The general idea behind it is that Death – that’s the guy with the pointy farming implement --  is doing his usual thing on Earth’s first interstellar spaceship when he runs into a unique problem – and one that requires an unorthodox solution.

MTI:  And how about "Rendezvous."  What's that one about?

BL:  I decided that if I go with a comedy for one story, I might as well go for dark in the other. It involves a rogue angel and the entity – one that turns out to be very familiar -  tapped to bring the angel in for justice.

MTI:  Do either of these stories hold any special significance, perhaps seeking to provoke some thoughts about the afterlife, or were they just a lot of fun fiction?

BL:  A bit from column A and a bit from column B, to be honest. There was the comedic aspect of "A Company of Deaths" that I enjoy putting in many of my works and the flexing of one’s creative muscles when you try something completely different in "Rendezvous" but there was a bit of exploration of some common themes of the afterlife. What, exactly, would it be like to be ‘Death’? What happens if you’re supposed to be the ‘good guy’ but you’re forced to sit idly by while evil occurs? What are the unintended consequences of doing good – or evil, for that matter?

MTI:  Okay, on a totally unrelated note, if you could meet and talk with any one deceased person, who would it be?

BL:  Oh – just one? That’s a tough out! If just one, I’ll say Ray Bradbury. I inherited a massive collection of his works from my sister when I was a kid and it influenced me to this day. I think I’ll love to meet him and, aside from the usual questions all writers get asked (“Where do you get your ideas?”) I’ll tell him “Thanks” as well.

MTI:  Shifting back to your writing, can you tell us a little about what you're working on right now?

BL:  So much! I think I may have a bit of ADD when it comes to story ideas! At the moment there’s a novel called “The Coin” that’s about three quarters completed and which I hope to finish by spring 2015. I also have, in no particular order, a steampunk story, a story about a domestic couple – that just happen to be a superhero/supervillain duo, a dragon story, a ghost story, a story involving a support group for all the ‘Last Man on Earth’, and even a zombie story.

MTI:  Other than your piece appearing in To Hell with Dante, do you have any other stories being published in the near future?

BL:  Quite a few are appearing in other anthologies by Martinus Publishing in 2015.

MTI:  Speaking about your other works, you have stories that appear in several other Martinus Publishing anthologies.  Why not tell us about a couple of your favorite ones?

BL:  Three in particular I like, for a variety of different reasons.

‘A Thursday Night at Doctor What’s Time and Relative Dimensional Space Bar and Grill’ in the Temporal Element anthology is on the list for two reasons; one, it’s my first published story and two, it, in the words of one reader, ‘broke my homage-meter’ on every single story involving time travel you may have heard or read. I had a blast writing it.

‘The Road Was Lit with Moon and Star’ in the Altered America anthology is on the list because it explores an interesting ‘what if’; what if Apollo 11 crashed on impact and Neil Armstrong never took that first step? I’m a big space enthusiast and I was a bit surprised to discover how few stories there are out there based on such a premise.

The third is ‘Gold Fever’ in theQuests, Curses and Vengeance anthology. It’s a short but creepy horror story set during the Klondike Gold Rush. I always wanted to try my hand at straight up horror and that story was the result.

MTI:  You also have a novel out there, Snake Oil.  Here's your chance to pitch that to the people.  Tell them why it's a must read!

BL:  It’s a fantastic story and one that everyone should read!

The basic premise is quite simple: aliens show up on Earth in the near future. But these aliens are not here to destroy us or bring us into the Federation or to enlighten us or any of that nonsense. Instead they’re here to…sell us their crap!

Basically – what if humanity’s first contact with aliens turns out to be the used car salesmen of the galaxy?

MTI:  Writers are often voracious readers.  Have you run across any good literature lately that you'd like to recommend?  You know, other than your own great work.

BL:  A good friend of mine gave me a copy of ‘Under Heaven’ by Guy Gavriel Kay as a present. It is a staggeringly amazing and beautiful book. It’s, literally, every type of book in one: historical, speculative fiction, love story, war story, intrigue – it has it all.

MTI:  Other than writing, what would you call your favorite hobby or pastime?

BL:  I’ve had an off-again, on-again fascination with photography. It’s now back into its on-again phase.

MTI:  Once again, you have the attention of potential readers.  Do you have any words of wisdom to share with them, or possibly a sales pitch to encourage them to read more of your writing?

BL:  Neil Gaiman said it best and I’ll repeat his words here:

“Go and make interesting mistakes, make amazing mistakes, make glorious and fantastic mistakes. Break rules. Leave the world more interesting for your being here. The one thing you have that nobody else has is you. Your voice, your mind, your story, your vision. So write and draw and build and play and dance and live as only you can. The moment that you feel that just possibly you are walking down the street naked…that’s the moment you may be starting to get it right.”

Words to live by, indeed.

MTI:  Thank you again for a fantastic interview, Bruno!  Those who want to check out his latest pair of published stories can pick up "ToHell with Dante."



Wednesday, November 26, 2014

Author Interview: Diane Arrelle 2

"To Hell with Dante" is a collection of cynical afterlife stories, ranging from comedic genius to dark surrealism.  To help kick off this fine anthology, I'll be conducting interviews with many of the contributors.  Today I'm interviewing Diane Arrelle, the talented author who contributed the story "Believing for a Reason."  Thank you for being here, Diane.

MTI:  I believe we did an interview before, when you contributed to The Temporal Element.  But for readers who missed that interview, why not start off by telling us a little about yourself.

DA: I have been writing for about 25 years. I worked for a newspaper for 2 years then freelanced for the next 15 years. I wrote a humor/family/opinion column for nine years until the newspaper group went out of business.  I loved the column because as the mother of two children, no one ever seemed to care about my opinion at home.        
As for fiction, I have had about 200 short stories published and I have 29 of them in my book, Just A Drop In The Cup.  I had a second book, Elements Of The Short Story, published in 2007.
Like many writers, I have had a wide variety of jobs including being an elementary school teacher for 10 years and for the last 15 years I have been the director of municipal senior centers. I just retired two months ago.

MTI:  Your story, Believing for a Reason, appears in To Hell with Dante, tell us a little bit about that.  What's the general idea behind it?

DA: I guess the main idea is that you need to believe in something to move on,  even if that belief is a total rejection of everything we have been told to believe.  It is my rejection of dogma.

MTI:  Does your story hold any special significance, perhaps seeking to provoke some thoughts about the afterlife, or was it just a lot of fun fiction?

DA: Although the story was a lot of fun to write, and the main character such a hopeless narcissist, it really stems from the need to question what we have been told to blindly believe in.  

MTI: Okay, on a totally unrelated note, if you could meet and talk with any one deceased person, who would it be?

DA: On a shallow personal note, my Aunt Rose, who passed away at the age of 15 and took some secrets with her.  I think Moses would be a wonderful choice, so much fact and fiction mixed together, I’d love to hear the real version of the Exodus from Egypt.

MTI: Shifting back to your writing, can you tell us a little about what you're working on right now?

DA:  I wish I were being more ambitious. I retired to write, but I’ve spent most of the time out with my friends and doing yard work. A lesson here, don’t retire in the fall if you live rural, because you spend most of the time raking.  I am working on several things including a book based on my column, I am planning on putting out a book of short stories on Kindle and I am trying to write stories for several anthologies including one for Temporal Elements II

MTI:  Other than your piece appearing in To Hell with Dante, do you have any other stories being published in the near future?

DA:  I have a story coming out in Sha Daa Facets, my story, The Smart Phone will be appearing in K-Zine in 2015 and my story There Will Always Be Hell To Pay will be in the anthology, Paying The Ferryman in 2015 as well.

MTI:  Your story, "Paradox Lost" appears in The Temporal Element, the very first Martinus Publishing anthology every released.  Do you have any thoughts about that particular story to share with our readers?

DA:  I had a great time writing that story. It was totally tongue in cheek in tone but it came from the time travel paradoxes that nag me when I lay awake at night.  What would happen if you went back in time to murder someone but accidently killed yourself?   Although I get good ideas when I’m wide awake in bed, I’d still rather be sleeping and save those ideas for a different time.  

MTI:  On a lighter note, have you watched any good tv lately?

DA:  I love Dr. Who speaking of time travel, I have been watching it since the Tom Baker years. I still watch Saturday Night Live, but mostly out of habit, although I do like the openings and the news.  I watch mostly movies on TV and HBO. Yes, I did watch True Blood, although I usually find trendy horror creatures boring.

MTI:  How about music?

DA:  My taste is eclectic and I like so much on the radio today.  I love the sound track from Pirate Radio when I’m in the 60’s sort of mood and Pitch Perfect for a mix of music. Being that it is November, I am getting ready to listen to the Trans Siberian Orchestra. I an taking a road trip with my husband on Black Friday to see them perform in Pennsylvania.  

MTI:  What are three of your favorite movies?  You know, the ones that never get old.

DA:  Field Of Dreams, that one always makes me cry at the end.  I love Shrek, the original The Producers and Secondhand Lions (ok so I picked 4).

MTI:  Of course, writers are some of the most voracious readers these days.  Tell me, have you run across any great pieces of literature lately?

DA:  Well, I’ve been enjoying Carl Hiaasen, Augusten Burroughs, Davis Sedaris, Janet Evanovich and Bill Bryson

MTI:  You have the attention of potential readers.  Do you have any words of wisdom to share with them, or possibly a sales pitch to encourage them to read more of your writing?

DA:  I write under a pen name, Diane Arrelle, so be sure to look for me under it. I have the upcoming stories  mentioned above and I have a story in State Of Horror New Jersey, a few stories currently in Were Travele, and my story A Woman Sporned in Paranormal Horror II.  I also have a piece in Chicken Soup For The Soul True Love and one in Finding your Happiness, both of those under my real name Dina Leacock.

MTI:  Of course, readers love free samples, so let's give them a taste.  Here are the first few paragraphs of your story, as featured in To Hell with Dante:

            Matilda Davis knew she was going to die.  One minute she was driving too fast on an icy bridge and the next... well, the next was a series of images, crashing through the guardrail, the car landing on its roof with a bone snapping crack, and then the awareness of nothingness.
            Puzzling feeling... nothingness... “Am I dead?”
            Laughter by many and a lone voice saying, “Give the woman a chance to acclimate.”
            “Hello?” Matilda called.
            “Hello,” a voice answered.
            “Are you... are you God?”
            The giggles started again.
            “Cut it out,” the voice called to the unseen crowd and then to Matilda,  ”Do you want me to be your god?”
            Matilda felt a wash of confusion. “My god?  I... I don’t have a personal god. Is this heaven?  Is this some sort of test to get in?  Why are people laughing at me?” Matilda was starting to feel emotions again and annoyance crept into her voice. “And what’s with all this nothing. Why can’t I see anything? Where are you people?”
            The voice asked, “Do you have a god?”
            “Hey, look, whoever you are. I don’t have time for this mystical crap. Just answer my questions.”
            “Ah,” the voice sighed. “An angry soul.”

MTI:  Thanks for another great interview.  Those who want to read the rest of this story and 20 others can pick up To Hell with Dante.


Sunday, November 16, 2014

Setbacks and Delays

Martinus Publishing isn't doing well, and neither am I at the moment.  As a quick heads-up, I'd like to inform everyone of the situation.

Sticking just with the publishing side of things, sales are currently awful.  The last two anthologies, Life of the Dead, and To Hell with Dante have both tanked, big time.  We are seeing virtually no sales of these titles, and I've spent more (much more) on advertising than has actually come back.  These titles are essentially dead.  That is very disheartening, and I dread having to send out royalty reports in January to the contributors.  I hate sending out pocket change for the authors who have contributed stories, and I further hate to let them know that nobody's buying their work.  Some will roll with it, some will be understanding, and maybe a few will just be upset and blame me for not being a rich New York City publishing house.

There is a huge pile of slush on my computer, waiting to be read, but due to various reasons I have been unable to focus adequately to get through most of it lately.  If you can imagine a writer with "reader's block" then that's me at the moment.  I cannot stand to look at the raw print some days, and I can't give an adequate assessment of a submission if that is the case.  Most of the open anthologies are closing to submissions by the end of the year, at least, so I might get a breather to catch up in January.  Maybe.

I have quite a few personal things troubling me, but those are my business, and I will not trouble anyone else with them.  Needless to say, I do not ask for your pity or your sympathy.  I only say it so you won't be surprised by any delays that might arise due to my current state of mind.  Don't be surprised if you don't get a timely response to a submission.

A little over 3 months ago, I quipped in a radio interview that I was "too stubborn to quit" when it came to the publishing industry.  That may still be the case, but I can't run myself into the ground for nothing.  When you have 2 flops in a row, and find yourself broke with no means to even run any more online ads, it really isn't much motivation.  Worse still, I don't even have the money to get some other projects I have in the works off the ground.  Damn it, I can't stand the thought of telling people I'm too financially strapped to make their dreams come true.

I realized some years ago that I was not liable to be able to become the successful writer that I always sought to become, but I thought I could help others on their trek toward that goal. Now, I can't even do that, so what good am I?  I'm sorry.

I'm not giving up.  I'm not shutting down.  However, I will say that writing and publishing aren't my most important concerns anymore.  Being a writer is something that has defined me my entire life.  Yet, the greatest success in the world would not grant me what I truly need in life.  No, that is something entirely different, and I have only just begun to understand it.  When that is achieved, perhaps then the writing will matter again. 


Someday...

Thursday, November 13, 2014

Author Interview: Francis Gideon

"To Hell with Dante" is a collection of cynical afterlife stories, ranging from comedic genius to dark surrealism.  To help kick off this fine anthology, I'll be conducting interviews with many of the contributors.  Today I'm interviewing Francis Gideon, the talented author who contributed the story "Alone and In Debt."  Thank you for being here, Francis.

FG: Thank you for having me!

MTI:  Starting off, could you tell our readers a little bit about yourself?

FG: Sure! Right now, I’m a horror writer living in Canada. I just moved to a new city to be closer to my university as I start my PhD.

MTI:  Now, getting down to business; what first compelled you to weave fiction, and what's your favorite type of story to write?

FG: When I was young, I read the book “The Outsiders” by S. E. Hinton. I really liked it, but I remembered being even more impressed by the fact that the author wrote and published the book when she was around 16-17 years old. I was about twelve at the time, and decided that if she could do something like that so young, then I could too. So I started writing more seriously then. Most of my “novels” never ended up more than thirty pages on loose leaf paper, but it was a start.

My favourite stories to write are a toss-up between horror and romance, actually. I always figured those genres were the most relatable, since everyone has experienced some type of love before (be it from family, friends, or significant other) and we’ve all been scared, too. I was lucky that “Alone and In Debt” is a little bit of both.

MTI:  Tell me, if you had to pick just one author who has influenced or inspired you, who would it be?

FG: Other than S. E. Hinton, who first got me really interested in doing writing professionally, I would say either Angela Carter or Kurt Vonnegut. Both of them aren’t afraid to be really, really weird in their fiction—and to take risks.

MTI:  Your story, Alone and In Debt, appears in To Hell with Dante, tell us a little bit about that.  What's the general idea behind it?

FG: At the time, I remember reading a lot of stories with demon possessions, or deals with demons/devils. It’s a very common theme—from Faustus to Supernatural now. But I always wondered how people really dealt with the fact that they had been possessed or were now going to hell. I began to wonder what types of emotions that would involve—and how people could comfort one another during that. So, I thought of a therapy group just like Narcotics Anonymous, but for people who had made deals. The rest of the story came easily after I already had a setting.

MTI:  Does your story hold any special significance, perhaps seeking to provoke some thoughts about the afterlife, or was it just a lot of fun fiction?

FG: It was a lot of fun! Most of what I end up doing becomes a thought experiment—a process of asking myself “what if…?” for certain scenarios, and in that way, I suppose I’m trying to get the audience to ask themselves the same types of questions. There is one scene, with Corey and Adam in the diner, where they talk about how “monsters are national creatures.” That, in particular, I find to be a really fascinating thought. A lot of scholarship on horror films echoes this statement, too. Coming from Canada, I see the subtle differences between the horror films I grew up watching—Black Christmas, Ginger Snaps—and the US horror films. Horror is always a shadow of the current time it was made in, and to think of a different monster for each country, is something really captivating and thought provoking for me. I can only hope the audience thinks so as well.

MTI:  Okay, on a totally unrelated note, if you could meet and talk with any one deceased person, who would it be?

FG: Since most of my favourite authors are dead now, I would probably say one of them! Or Robin Williams.

MTI:  Shifting back to your writing, can you tell us a little about what you're working on right now?

FG: A lot of things, actually! I have a YA zombie novel that I’m putting the finishing touches on right now, in between my PhD work. I know, most people would probably groan hearing about another YA zombie novel, but I’m hoping to approach the contagion aspect of this a little differently, using some outside research. Only time will tell if I’m able to pull it off.

MTI:  Other than your piece appearing in To Hell with Dante, do you have any other stories being published in the near future?

FG: Yes! I just had a Halloween story released with Mocha Memoirs Press called “Surrender to Destiny” about a London detective investigating the bodies of men hollowed out and colonized by insects. I also have a few holidays stories (mostly romance though) coming out with JMS Books, too.

Here are some links:




MTI:  On a lighter note, have you watched any good tv lately?

FG: Yes! The TV show Hannibal (an adaptation of the Thomas Harris universe) continues to impress me more and more each time I watch it. The cinematography is beautiful and their new treatment of the stories really captivates me as an old fan of the books/movies.

MTI:  How about music?

FG: Gerard Way (former front man of the band My Chemical Romance) recently released his solo album Hesitant Alien, which has been getting a lot of plays for me recently. He even has a song about a manga on it! The whole album has a kind of Brit Pop, David Bowie vibe to it. Really nice to listen to as I grade papers.

MTI:  What are three of your favorite movies?  You know, the ones that never get old.

FG: Too hard—but I’ll try. Surprise, they’re mostly horror or comic book related: Silence of the Lambs, The Company of Wolves, and The Dark Knight.

MTI:  You have the attention of potential readers.  Do you have any words of wisdom to share with them, or possibly a sales pitch to encourage them to read more of your writing?

FG: Hmm, Kurt Vonnegut is always so much better at small sound bites for occasions like this. The only thing that springs to mind is “Goddammit, you’ve got to be kind.” Be nice to people. We all need each other in some way and we all have different stuff going on that makes it difficult. It’s far, far better to need people and ask for help every once in a while than to completely shun everyone for the sake of reputation or something else abstract. The older I get, the more I think about being kind and just how important it is.

Thanks again for having me!

Of course, Francis.  It was a Pleasure.  Those who wish to check out Alone and In Debt, along with 20 other cynical afterlife stories, can pick up To Hell with Dante!



Tuesday, November 11, 2014

Veterans Day Poem: Ode to the Absent Fallen

It's Veterans Day again (or Armistice Day, as my Great-Grandfather Ned would insist).  In honor of those who have served, those who have fought, those who have fallen, here is a piece of poetry I was inspired to write while visiting a cemetery not so long ago.

The flags flutter in the breeze,
symbols of memory,
of passed away dreams.
The heroes, the fallen,
those who have gone,
will a final rest ever truly be known?

I sit and I wonder
where have you gone?
Is it a far better meeting
or more a tribulation tone?
Will I know it all soon
or be condemned to ignorance
for the weeping we've sown?

For the days have gone too soon;
as I look at the stones
my mind hearkens back to you,
forever alone.
A day come and gone;
I'll miss you, you know,
but we'll someday find solace
in the truth we have known

I leave you with these words;
come back home.


Do something to honor a Veteran today.  We owe them!



Sunday, November 9, 2014

Author Interview: Karl G. Rich 2

"To Hell with Dante" is a collection of cynical afterlife stories, ranging from comedic genius to dark surrealism.  To help kick off this fine anthology, I'll be conducting interviews with many of the contributors.  Today I'm interviewing Karl G. Rich, the excellent author who contributed the story "Everybody Goes to Heaven, and Then..."  Thank you for being here, Mr. Rich

KARL G. RICH:  Thank you, Martin, it’s a pleasure, but please call me Kregger. Karl Rich is the name I give the barista down at Starbucks since my real name seems both unpronounceable and incapable of being spelled correctly. Karl’s an alter ego I have used since the Stone Age when I worked in the restaurant biz.

MTI:  Of course, Kregger.  We've done this before, but for readers who didn't catch our last interview, why not tell them a little about yourself?

KREGGER:  First and foremost, I am a grandfather of six. Being Papa seems to have swallowed all my other identities. As a young adult, before kids and my current wife--on entering a restaurant, instead of smoking/nonsmoking, I would ask for the “No Kids” section. Children weren’t my favorite people, but now my favorite people call me grandpa.

At work I’m a healthcare professional. I take painstaking care not to talk about work with strangers. This is due to their reactions to the tonnage of blood, gore and pain I deal with on a daily basis. One time my brother-in-law asked me, “What was the worse thing I have ever seen?” I described in detail how a prolapsed rectum nearly ate an intern in an operating room. Thank God, I caught the young doctor by his surgical booties before he disappeared forever. Can anyone imagine that eulogy? Now, my brother-in-law knows better than to ask such silly questions.

MTI:  Your story, "Everybody Goes to Heaven, and Then..." appears in To Hell with Dante.  Tell us a little bit about that.  What's the general idea behind it?

KREGGER:  I spend a lot of time writing about heaven and hell. I don’t believe in either place as popularized in the media or religion, but the perception of both places allow for a variety of stories. Imbedded within most of my stories are retellings of old jokes. In “Everybody Goes to Heaven, and Then…” I used a classic internet joke with some of my recurring characters to illustrate choices people make. In death as in life bad choices and bad decisions lead to bad things. Right now, I’m trying to shoehorn a joke about not stepping on ducks/bunnies in heaven into a story, but I’ve yet to figure it out.

MTI: Does your story hold any special significance, perhaps seeking to provoke some thoughts about the afterlife, or was it just a lot of fun fiction?

KREGGER:  Just plain fun. I’ve given up trying to convince anyone of anything. I write for fun.

MTI:  Okay, on a totally unrelated note, if you could meet and talk with any one deceased person, who would it be?

KREGGER:  Honestly, the first person that came to my mind was Adolph Hitler. Not because I admire or idolize the man, but to ask WTF were you thinking? In what world would a man or group of people think it proper to exterminate any other group? I believe his answer would probably be the world of the 21st Century.

MTI:  Shifting back to your writing, can you tell us a little about what you're working on right now?

KREGGER:  I have a Sci-fi project that is an extension of my story in the Veterans of the Future Wars anthology called, “I am Drone.” It is a futuristic thriller set in a post-nuclear-war America with human drones used as weapons of mass destruction to safe guard what’s left of America.

MTI:  Oh, I want to read that one!  Keep me apprised of your progress with that project.  Other than your piece appearing in To Hell with Dante, do you have any other stories being published in the near future?

KREGGER:  I’m waiting on a submission to Vineyard Press for the Passions of Man anthology. I have one more submission called, “The Absence of Heat” slated for publication in the We Were Heros anthology by Martinus Publishing. This winter I will start querying for my novel, The Mad King of Beaver Island.

MTI:  Writers are often voracious readers.  Have you run across any good literature lately that you'd like to recommend?  You know, other than your own great work.

KREGGER:  I’m in the process of slogging through a compilation of twelve novels called, Deadly Dozen:12 Mysteries/Thrillers.  It’s something I picked up for learning style and technique of the genre. The stories are interesting, but I’m noticing a staccato style in the writing. Most of the books utilize very short chapters to move the story along. I couldn’t beat the price, and if I hate a story I skip to the next one. I read Timebound by this year’s ABNA winner. Here’s a clue to new writers—women are not male characters with breasts.  So write female characters with female traits. Today’s market, we are selling to, are women. Conversely, I suggest women writers not emasculate their characters as Rysa Walker did in Timebound. I also enjoyed Malone Hero by Edmond Wells, a long time contributor to Martinus Publishing.

MTI:  Other than writing, what would you call your favorite hobby or pastime?

KREGGER:  I always have been and will always be a sailor. It is the one thing that defines me till I die. At which time I will be submerged in Lake Michigan. I do not understand anyone that fears water.

MTI:  Once again, you have the attention of potential readers.  Do you have any words of wisdom to share with them, or possibly a sales pitch to encourage them to read more of your writing?

KREGGER:  I write because I enjoy the process.  I look forward to seclusion with the Margaritaville channel playing in the background. I prefer to sail alone for the same reason. I don’t have an eye for what is marketable. I only write what makes me happy. Happy people are successful by whatever criteria are used.

It is impossible to write every minute of the day, so on those off moments Martinus Publishing has multiple anthologies available as well as Martin Ingham’s newest creation, The Curse of Selwood.

MTI:  Well, thank you for the extra plug there.  Now, readers love free stuff, so here's the start of your story in To Hell with Dante:

Clinton walked down a dirt footpath.  He was surrounded by dense fog and an overlying canopy of trees in dusky twilight. In front of him a white light beaconed through the fog, as if an opening to a tunnel.
            “Where am I?” he muttered as he walked alone, squinting into the brush beside the path.
            He walked for what seemed like an eternity through the impenetrable fog and foliage. He carried a pack and musket, but couldn’t recall camping, sleeping, or hunting. He halted and listened; the forest sounds were muted and soft.  Birds called to one another in the distance and since the wind had died there was silence from the trees above. The fog not only muffled his sight, but dampened his hearing as well. Everything smelled wet and decayed.
            White woolen pants covered his legs down to his knees and wool socks protected his feet from chafing inside tall, black boots. Glancing down at the blouse he wore under his red military coat, he found dark-red blood stains, but no wounds.  For the hundredth time in as many days, he wondered, where had he come from?
            He came to an intersection in the path. The path to the left and right led to a white light-filled tunnel. He spun around to find a similar portal to his rear. The tall man gripped his hands in prayer and fell to his knees. “God help me.” He bowed his head and shuddered.


MTI:  Thank you again, Kregger, for a fantastic interview.  Those who want to read the rest of his story, as well as 20 other cynical afterlife stories, can pick up To Hell with Dante!


Wednesday, November 5, 2014

Author Interview: Jeff Provine 2

To Hell with Dante is a collection of cynical afterlife stories, ranging from comedic genius to dark surrealism.  To help kick off this fine anthology, I'll be conducting interviews with many of the contributors.  Today I'm interviewing Jeff Provine, the excellent author who contributed the story "Gravedigger."  Thank you for being here, Jeff

JEFF PROVINE: Always a pleasure!

MTI:  We've done this before, but for readers who didn't catch our last interview, why not tell them a little about yourself?

JP:  I’m an adjunct professor in Oklahoma City teaching Composition, Mythology, and a course called “The History of Comics.” It’s work that gets me pulled in three directions at once, but it does give some time in my schedule for writing projects.

Since it’s the Halloween season: one of my other projects has been creating the OU Ghost Tour, a charity walk around Norman’s campus telling spooky stories from the past. It has been a great time researching and interviewing (I’m not much of an investigator; I just don’t have the patience). Two books collecting local legends have spun off it: Campus Ghosts of Norman, Oklahoma and, new for 2014, Haunted Norman, Oklahoma.

MTI:  Your story, “Gravedigger,” appears in To Hell with Dante, tell us a little bit about that.  What's the general idea behind it?

JP:  The idea came out of the many references to those gateways to Hell in places like Turkmenistan, Sicily, and Ireland… what if someone stumbled across a new one?

There’s another story behind the story as well, one that began Halloween night, 2010. The air hung heavy with mist as the warm fall day turned to a chilly night. As I walked along in my mad scientist’s costume to meet some friends for a party, the mists parted, and there came along a pretty young lady dressed in gender-bent Vash the Stampede from Trigun. It was like I dream. I’m sure my mouth was gaping. We passed by each other, traded smiles and quips of “nice coat” for her red trench coat and white lab coat. And then she was gone.

For days, I couldn’t get the image out of my head. I was enamored. Who was this girl?

Then, as I had told the story a time or two, it bounced back through the grapevine that someone had a class with the girl, who had worn her Vash costume to class. I had to make sure, so I staked out the class. While I was waiting, I had a notebook with me and spent some time jotting notes for stories. “Gravedigger” spawned out of that.

It was her class, and we did end up going on a couple of dates, but nothing really took off. It was just as well since, a couple of holidays down the road, I met my future wife at a New Year’s Party.

MTI:  Does your story hold any special significance, perhaps seeking to provoke some thoughts about the afterlife, or was it just a lot of fun fiction?

JP:  The story’s theme is taking the reality of Hell and showing what one might be willing to trade for it. To get the feel, I made lots of references to Revelation, the paintings of Hieronymous Bosch, and modern horror. Even though we know it’s horrible, the gravedigger has the chance to gain so much if he’s willing to sell his soul for just a few days at a time: money, fame, power.

MTI:  Okay, on a totally unrelated note, if you could meet and talk with any one deceased person, who would it be?

JP:  The figures in the story (Vlad, Jack, and the 1980s Business Man) are each fascinating characters. On the one hand, asking someone about their buried treasure would be a good deceased person to meet. On the other, great figures like Theodore Roosevelt or Walt Disney would be interesting. Personally, I would like to have a good talk with my late grandfather, who passed away when I was a teenager. He had a lot of wisdom to share that I was too young to understand.

MTI:  Shifting back to your writing, can you tell us a little about what you're working on right now?

JP:  I’m looking at creating a loosely connected batch of stories all tied together geographically in the spirit of Arkham, Massachusetts, and Derry, Maine: Chisholm County, Oklahoma. Many of its stories are inspired by actual Oklahoma events that I’ve researched while writing my Campus Ghosts and Haunted Norman creative nonfiction collections of local lore.

MTI:  Other than your piece appearing in To Hell with Dante, do you have any other stories being published in the near future?

JP:  I’ve got a short story in the collection Krampusnacht coming out this Christmas from World Weaver. Bad little boys and girls watch out for the monstrous goatman with a switch!

MTI:  Writers are often voracious readers.  Have you run across any good literature lately that you'd like to recommend?  You know, other than your own great work.

JP:  I read the Mammoth Collection Volume 1 of Elephantmen a short time back. It was classic science fiction in every sense of the word.

MTI:  Other than writing, what would you call your favorite hobby or pastime?

JP:  I’m a big board game enthusiast. We’re living in a golden age of indie board games thanks to technological development in printing and design. It’s exciting to see all the new takes on how tabletop gaming can go.

MTI:  Once again, you have the attention of potential readers.  Do you have any words of wisdom to share with them, or possibly a sales pitch to encourage them to read more of your writing?

JP:  There are stories everywhere; we just have to take a look. I’m bubbling over with ideas, and the trick is to just get some time to put them down on paper.  One my favorite things in all of the world is to talk stories with people, so, if you have a story idea but aren’t sure where to go with it, feel free to chat!

MTI:  And now, to help satisfy our readers, here are the first few paragraphs from your story, Gravedigger!

The old gravedigger put his shovel through the earth and struck empty space. His gnarled hand caught the handle before the weight of the blade pulled it underground. He held it for a moment before he wiggled it back and forth to free it.
            Soil crumbled around the opening. Foul, wet air bubbled up into the grave, leaving a sick fog around his muddy boots. Dull, red light shone up from the crack in the ground.
            “What the hell…?” the gravedigger mumbled.
            He took a step backward. When he had sure footing at the edge of the six-foot grave, he looked back at the eerie hole. It seemed larger.
            The gravedigger licked his lip, tasting sweat and dirt. He’d dug graves for the family mortuary since he could walk. These days his grandson did most of the digging with the backhoe, but he still took his exercise by digging a few by hand. There wasn’t much more relaxing than lovingly crafting a grave in the quiet of the nighttime.
            In all those years of all those shovelfuls of ground, he’d never seen anything like this. He’d hit sinkholes and, once, a nest of badgers, but no red-glowing hole. It stank, and the light cast up horrid bleeding shadows. The shop light hanging over his head seemed drowned out.

MTI:  Thank you again, Jeff, for another great interview. Those who want to read the rest of Gravedigger and 20 other cynical afterlife stories can buy To Hell with Dante!



Sunday, November 2, 2014

Cover Reveal: The Temporal Element II

The Temporal Element II is still accepting submissions until the end of 2014, but I am pleased to reveal the following cover art for this upcoming anthology!  Here is the piece with tentative lettering:




The artwork was done by the very talented Anastasia Karasyova.


The Temporal Element II has a planned release date of February/March 2015.  For those of you who can't wait for this exciting new collection of time travel tales, the first collection, The Temporal Element, is still available!  Pick up a copy while you wait for the second set of stories in the new year!